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November 2020

People with diabetes are prone to developing diabetic foot ulcers, sores on the feet that can heal very slowly or may never heal at all. About 5% of people with diabetes develop chronic foot ulcers, which can cause complications such as infection and amputation. Preventing diabetic foot ulcers is of the utmost importance. If you have diabetes, it is necessary to know how to manage your condition. You should be aware of the medications that you take and their dosages, eat a balanced diet, take any prescribed supplements, see your doctor regularly, and monitor your foot health. A podiatrist can teach you how to perform daily foot checks to identify any cuts, scrapes, sores, or wounds on your feet early. The earlier these things are detected, the better they respond to treatment. A podiatrist can also teach you how to care for foot wounds at home. For more information about diabetic foot wounds, please speak with a podiatrist. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with John Killough, DPM from Regional Foot Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 23 November 2020 00:00

Can Gout Cause Difficulty Walking?

The toe that is most often affected by gout is the big toe. Crystals can form in the joints of the toes, causing severe pain and difficulty walking. There are specific triggers that are known to cause gout. These can include eating foods such as red meat and shellfish, and drinking beverages that have a high sugar content. Additionally, genetic factors may contribute significantly in the development of gout. The symptoms that are associated with gout is tenderness surrounding the affected joint, redness, and stiffness. An effective method that may help to prevent gout can be including fresh fruits and vegetables in your daily eating habits, in addition to drinking plenty of fresh water. If you are afflicted with frequent gout attacks, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Gout is a foot condition that requires certain treatment and care. If you are seeking treatment, contact John Killough, DPM from Regional Foot Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Gout?

Gout is a type of arthritis caused by a buildup of uric acid in the bloodstream. It often develops in the foot, especially the big toe area, although it can manifest in other parts of the body as well. Gout can make walking and standing very painful and is especially common in diabetics and the obese.

People typically get gout because of a poor diet. Genetic predisposition is also a factor. The children of parents who have had gout frequently have a chance of developing it themselves.

Gout can easily be identified by redness and inflammation of the big toe and the surrounding areas of the foot. Other symptoms include extreme fatigue, joint pain, and running high fevers. Sometimes corticosteroid drugs can be prescribed to treat gout, but the best way to combat this disease is to get more exercise and eat a better diet.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 16 November 2020 00:00

What Causes a Tailor’s Bunion?

A tailor’s bunion, also known as a bunionette, is similar to a regular bunion. However, a tailor’s bunion forms on the fifth metatarsal bone at the base of the little toe, also known as the pinky toe, as opposed to the big toe. In some cases, tailor’s bunions can be caused by an inherited mechanical structure that results in the enlargement of the bone and causes the bone to move outward while the toe moves inward. In other cases, bone spurs that form on the toe can also appear as a tailor’s bunion. Shoes that are too narrow in the toe can not only lead to new tailor’s bunions, but they can aggravate existing ones as well. If you are dealing with pain from a tailor’s bunion, it is important to consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan. 

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact John Killough, DPM of Regional Foot Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 09 November 2020 00:00

Heel Spurs 101

The plantar fascia is the band of tissue that connects the heel and the toes. Heel spurs are bony growths that form close to where the plantar fascia attaches to the heel. The growth generally forms as a protective measure to keep an overstressed muscle or tendon from being pulled. Factors that can contribute to heel spurs include having flat feet, high arches, tightening of the Achilles tendon, obesity, or a sudden increase in activity. Pain and swelling under the heel, numbness on the outside of the foot, and pain that is worst upon getting up in the morning are usually signs of heel spurs. Heel spurs can be very painful, especially when walking, and medical attention may be needed. A podiatrist will be able to provide a proper diagnosis and suggest treatment options. Common treatments may involve relieving pressure on the heel bone, often using orthotics.  

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact John Killough, DPM from Regional Foot Center. Our doctor will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Monday, 02 November 2020 00:00

Plantar Warts 101

Plantar warts are small growths on the foot’s sole that grow because of the human papillomavirus (HPV). The HPV virus that usually causes plantar warts is contagious and thrives in warm moist environments. Therefore, those who are commonly barefoot in communal areas, such as gymnasts, swimmers, and dancers, or those who have a weakened immune system, are at a higher risk for developing a plantar wart. Plantar warts usually appear as skin growths that feel rough and hard with a black dot in the center. They can also be painful when they are pressed or during walking. If you believe you have a plantar wart, a podiatrist will be able to help with a diagnosis and treatment. Treatments can include prescription creams, cryotherapy, and laser treatment. 

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact John Killough, DPM from Regional Foot Center. Our doctor will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about All About Plantar Warts
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