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March 2022

Tuesday, 29 March 2022 00:00

Swollen Feet are Common During Pregnancy

A common ailment that many pregnant women is swollen ankles. Mild swelling is considered to be normal during pregnancy, and can happen as a result of pressure the growing baby exerts on the body. Relief can be found by elevating the feet as often as possible, and it can help to sleep on the left side. Additionally, drinking plenty of fresh water, exercising regularly, and avoiding crossing the legs may bring comfort during pregnancy. Swimming can be beneficial as it keeps the body cool while exercising. If your feet are uncomfortable during pregnancy, and completing daily activities becomes difficult, please consult with a podiatrist who can examine the feet, and offer additional comfort tips.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with John Killough, DPM from Regional Foot Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Care for Pregnant Women

If your podiatrist suspects that you may have peripheral artery disease (PAD), they will most likely perform a vascular test called a duplex ultrasound. Duplex ultrasound uses two modes of ultrasound: 1) traditional ultrasound to create images of your blood vessels based on sound waves bouncing off them, and 2) doppler ultrasound to estimate the speed and direction of blood by recording sound waves that reflect off it as it flows. Duplex ultrasound is non-invasive and painless. Your podiatrist will spread gel on the skin of the area(s) to be tested, and then wave a transducer wand which emits the sound waves and records the echoes that are reflected. For more information about duplex ultrasound, ask your podiatrist.

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with John Killough, DPM from Regional Foot Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How Is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Vascular Testing in Podiatry
Tuesday, 15 March 2022 00:00

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion forms when bones in the front of the foot move and the big toe leans inward towards the smaller toes. The result of this process is a bony bump on the joint at the base of the big toe. The skin over the bump or bunion may be swollen, painful, and red and movement of the big toe may be limited. Bunions are often formed by the inherited structure of one’s foot, a foot problem or injury, or another physical condition, like arthritis. Tight, narrow shoes or high-heeled shoes can irritate bunions and aggravate all symptoms. Bunionettes are smaller bunions that form on the joint of the little toe. Because bunions can lead to other foot conditions, it is important to see a qualified podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

 

If you are suffering from bunions, contact John Killough, DPM of Regional Foot Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
Saturday, 12 March 2022 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Tuesday, 08 March 2022 00:00

Types of Metatarsal Fractures

The metatarsals are the five long bones located in the middle of your foot which connect the toes to the rest of the foot. When any of these bones break, it is known as a metatarsal fracture. There are several types of metatarsal fractures. Stress fractures occur when a bone develops one or more tiny cracks due to it being unable to bear the load placed on it. A Lisfranc fracture-dislocation occurs when the second metatarsal bone is broken and knocked out of place. A fracture of the fifth metatarsal bone, the most common type of metatarsal fracture, occurs when excessive stress or overuse causes the bone that connects your pinky toe to the rest of your foot to break. If you have symptoms of a broken foot bone, such as pain, swelling, bruising, and difficulty walking or bearing weight on the injured foot, it is strongly suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist as soon as possible.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact John Killough, DPM from Regional Foot Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot

Heel pain is a very common occurrence. It is usually felt under the heel or at the back of the heel. When pain and inflammation is located on the bottom of the heel toward the front of the foot, plantar fasciitis is typically the cause. Plantar fasciitis is a painful inflammation of the plantar fascia tissue, which runs along the bottom of the foot and connects the heel with the toes. Other causes of heel pain on the bottom of the foot may be attributed to heel pad atrophy or heel spurs. If pain is felt at the back of the heel, Achilles tendonitis is often at the root of the cause. This condition occurs when the Achilles tendon, which attaches to the back of the heel bone, becomes damaged or torn over time, causing pain and swelling. Other possible causes include bursitis, Sever’s disease, and heel bumps. Pain from a heel stress fracture can occur anywhere on the heel, and tarsal tunnel syndrome can cause heel pain underneath the ankle bone. Heel pain can also be caused by neurological issues, infections and arthritis. Unless you suffer an acute injury, heel pain typically starts out mild, but can become severe. If you are experiencing any type of heel pain, don’t hesitate to contact a podiatrist to find out the cause and take measures to keep it from worsening or becoming chronic or debilitating.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact John Killough, DPM of Regional Foot Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our offices located in Charleston and Effingham, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
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